Saturday, October 25, 2014

Families Parenting Adolescents With Substance Abuse-Recovering the Mother's Voice: A Narrative Literature Review.

Families Parenting Adolescents With Substance Abuse-Recovering the Mother's Voice: A Narrative Literature Review.
Research can be hard to read and often very dull because of it's dependence on statistics (that can often be very confusing). What is sometimes left out is the human voice that is screaming out from behind the hypothesis.  What does this mean to me? How does this research affect my life? If you are a mother of a child with substance abuse there is often a guilt that goes along with this and because of that people don't want to talk about it. But we must because, as we know intellectually, we are not alone.

In a recent research paper published in the Journal of Family Nursing a review of the literature was done from a narrative perspective. Where was the mother's voice in previous research on this topic? Here is the abstract from that study:
Authors: Smith JM, Estefan A

Alcohol and substance dependency are complex, problematic phenomena, which are growing worldwide. In particular, drug use and abuse among young people is a significant concern. Although addiction presents as a problem of dependent individuals, families are also profoundly affected by the family member's addiction. In this narrative literature review, we review published research from 1937 to 2014 to capture a narrative and historical perspective of addiction and family. We condense and analyze the experiences of parents with alcohol- and drug-dependent children, to emphasize the need for a more specific, in-depth exploration of mothers' experiences. Such exploration may advance nurses' understandings of individual, familial, and social complexities of parenting an addicted child.  Read More

J Fam Nurs. 2014 Oct 23;

We are looking to hear more about this study and encourage researchers to consider the family as a whole when it comes to these kinds of issues.


Tuesday, March 11, 2014

Maternal Warmth Matters Especially if you drink


Moderating effects of positive parenting and maternal alcohol use on emerging adults' alcohol use: Does living at home matter?
Moderating effects of positive parenting and maternal alcohol use on emerging adults' alcohol use: Does living at home matter?


Addict Behav. 2014 Feb 12;39(5):869-878
Authors: Cleveland MJ, Reavy R, Mallett KA, Turrisi R, White HR

Positive parenting behaviors and parental modeling of alcohol use are consistent predictors of offspring's alcohol use. Recent research extends these findings to emerging adult children and confirms continued parental influence beyond adolescence. This paper examines how maternal warmth and supervision moderate the effects of mother's heavy alcohol use on their offspring's alcohol use among a sample of non-college-attending emerging adults. Three-way interactions were used to examine if these moderating effects differed between emerging adults who lived at home and those with other living arrangements. Separate analyses within gender were used to further examine these associations. Participants were 245 emerging adults between ages 18 and 22years with no post-secondary education (59% female) who were selected from a national probability-based internet panel. Path analyses indicated that, regardless of living arrangements, male emerging adults who were more likely to witness their mother getting drunk were themselves more likely to engage in risky drinking. However, among female emerging adults, similarity between mothers' and daughters' drunkenness was strongest among participants who resided with their family and also reported low levels of maternal warmth. This study extends previous research by indicating that the effects of maternal modeling of heavy alcohol use on emerging adults' heavy alcohol use depend upon several factors, including the gender of the child and the family context. Implications of the study findings are discussed in terms of expanding the scope of a parent-based intervention (PBI) to all emerging adults, including those who do not attend colleges or universities.

24583277

Read More

COMMENT: This is an important study particularly considering that more and more of our kids are living at home for extended periods of time going on well past their high school years.  Often times we think of "parenting" as being a thing we do when our children are young.  But this study shows that a Mother's affection and warmth can be vital to our young men and women just as much as when they were infants.  We are role models for our kids no matter how old they get.  We will always be Mom.

Sunday, March 9, 2014

Mental health and parenting in rural areas: an exploration of parental experiences and current needs.


Mental health and parenting in rural areas: an exploration of parental experiences and current needs.
J Ment Health. 2014 Mar 3;
Authors: Cremers GE, Cogan NA, Twamley I

Background: Research on parental mental health problems (MHPs) has predominantly used urban samples and focused on the risks for children. Aims: The purpose of this study was to explore rural parents' lived experiences of parenting with a MHP. Method: Six semi-structured interviews were conducted with mothers who were using a mental health service in rural Ireland. Interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) was employed. Results: Themes identified were: "Being Observed and Negatively Judged by Others"; "Overshadowed by the Duality of Parenting and MHPs"; "Dominance of Medication Over Other Treatment Options"; "Uncertainty (of Impact on Parenting Ability and Children)" and "Need for Inclusion". Although parents' experienced a variety of concerns generic to parenting and mental health, living in a small, rural community was related to pronounced concerns regarding the stigma, devaluation and uncertainty associated with MHPs and service use. Conclusion: Further investigation into and consideration for the specific needs and experiences of parent service-users could benefit both parents and their families and inform service development.

24588400
Read More

Promoting parenting to support reintegrating military families: After deployment, adaptive parenting tools.

Promoting parenting to support reintegrating military families: After deployment, adaptive parenting tools.
Psychol Serv. 2014 Feb;11(1):31-40
Authors: Gewirtz AH, Pinna KL, Hanson SK, Brockberg D

The high operational tempo of the current conflicts and the unprecedented reliance on National Guard and Reserve forces highlights the need for services to promote reintegration efforts for those transitioning back to civilian family life. Despite evidence that parenting has significant influence on children's functioning, and that parenting may be impaired during stressful family transitions, there is a dearth of empirically supported psychological interventions tailored for military families reintegrating after deployment. This article reports on the modification of an empirically supported parenting intervention for families in which a parent has deployed to war. A theoretical rationale for addressing parenting during reintegration after deployment is discussed. We describe the intervention, After Deployment, Adaptive Parenting Tools (ADAPT), and report early feasibility and acceptability data from a randomized controlled effectiveness trial of ADAPT, a 14-week group-based, Web-enhanced parenting training program. Among the first 42 families assigned to the intervention group, participation rates were high, and equal among mothers and fathers. Satisfaction was high across all 14 sessions. Implications for psychological services to military families dealing with the deployment process are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

24564441
Read More


COMMENT: We need to do better to help our military families with their parenting challenges.

Saturday, March 8, 2014

Food advertisements in two popular u.s. Parenting magazines: results of a five-year analysis.


Food advertisements in two popular u.s. Parenting magazines: results of a five-year analysis.
Glob J Health Sci. 2014;6(2):175-82

Authors: Basch CH, Hammond R, Ethan D, Samuel L
This study's objective was to examine prevalence of food advertisements in popular parenting magazines and identify products by USDA food category. We analyzed 116 issues of two popular U.S. parenting magazines across five years. All food and beverage advertisements for USDA Food Category were coded. Breakfast cereals were coded for nutritional quality. The coding took place at varied libraries in New Jersey, in the United States. A total of 19,879 food and beverage products were analyzed. One-third of advertisements (32.5%) were for baked goods, snacks, and sweets -- products generally low in nutrient density. Two-thirds of the breakfast cereals were low in nutritional quality (64.6%). Beverages comprised 11% of the advertisements, fruit juices the highest proportion. Less than 3% of advertisements were for fruits and vegetables combined. No significant food product trends were evident across the five-year period. Food advertisements identified in parenting magazines were generally low in nutritional value. Additional research is necessary to determine the influence of food advertisements on parents' purchasing habits.


Obesity rates among American youth have prompted an examination of food advertisements geared towards children. Research indicates children's high exposure to these advertisements and their influence on food preferences. Less is known about the presence of these advertisements in parenting magazines.
24576378
Read More


COMMENT: We often talk about how susceptible children are to advertising but what this research tells me, more than anything, is that parents can be (and maybe are) just as easily swayed by advertising.  We have to do a better job of being health advocates for our kids.  Originally we had intended to put a picture of junk food on this post but then realized that what is important here is to reinforce images of healthy food choices - since we are all so easily moved by the images we see.